National Association of Manufacturers (NAM)

National Association of Manufacturers (NAM)

Commentary

US Capitol building

Darrel Issa’s Government Handover

January 05, 2011
Clean Air Act

Protecting the Clean Air Act: Getting the Jobs and Investment Story Right

September 13, 2010

Cry Wolf Quotes

There is little difference between men and women as regards their satisfactory performance in industry. Sound employment and personnel practices are applicable to both men and women are applicable to both men and women and no emphasis should be placed on any distinction between them as workers.

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Statement of the National Association of Manufacturers at the Senate Committee on Labor and Public Welfare (Subcommittee on Labor). Aug 1, 1962.
04/24/1962 | Full Details | Law(s): Equal Pay Act

Certain specific provisions of these bills are bound to result in extensive governmental intervention in employer-employee relations….These terms ‘comparable character’ and ‘comparable skills’ do not necessarily mean the same job. In fact, they are so general and so vague as to give an administrator a grant of power which could destroy the sound wage structure which many industrial companies have worked for years to perfect.

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Statement of the National Association of Manufacturers at the Senate Committee on Labor and Public Welfare (Subcommittee on Labor). Aug 1, 1962.
08/01/1962 | Full Details | Law(s): Equal Pay Act

We feel that the new plant should have equipment installed to abate pollution that meets and exceeds the established standards. If I recognize what you are driving at, company XYZ could come out with a piece of equipment that could be extremely expensive that would eliminate all pollution whatsoever and if I were to agree with your question, that would mean that all of your industry would then have to buy that piece of equipment from company XYZ with the basis against all other companies that are producing pollution equipment. I don’t think that is the objective of free enterprise.

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Donald R. Talbot, The National Association of Manufacturers, Testimony, Subcommittee on Air and Water Pollution of the Senate Committee on Public Works
04/20/1970 | Full Details | Law(s): Clean Water Act

[T]he human factor is one of the most important causal elements involved in any accidental occurrence. It is estimated that 75 percent or more of all injuries from accidents result from a negligent or unsafe act on the part of the individual involved….The development of positive safety attitudes and safety effectiveness on the part of each individual employee is the most direct approach to the reduction of industrial accidents.

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Paul R. Hafer, National Association of Manufacturers, Testimony, Senate Subcommittee on Labor and Public Welfare.

Evidence